English

Overview for Year 7:

In year 7, we want students to have a rich and enjoyable experience, leading them to engage with and to be highly motivated by their English lessons, as well as to understand and value the functional value of the subject. Having high expectations of our students, we strive for the success for all, regardless of their ability.

In their lessons, students are encouraged to work both independently and as part of different kinds of groups, and we endeavour to offer interesting and appropriate resources and learning activities for all students whatever their ability.

In addition to lessons in the classroom, all Key Stage 3 classes have a regular lesson in the library to help to promote good, independent reading habits and a real sense of pleasure from reading a range of fiction and non-fiction texts. Students are encouraged to challenge themselves in their reading and they all have Reading records that promote breadth of reading experience and allow them to record their reading habits beyond the classroom.

At year 7, students study:

A common introductory creative writing unit, which is assessed to support our understanding of students’ needs;

A range of non-fiction writing, including a letter to their primary school teacher;

Creative and expressive writing such as autobiographical writing and poetry;

A novel, such as ‘Skellig’, ‘Millions’ or ‘There’s a Boy in the Girls’ Bathroom’;

An author study of Children’s Laureate, Malorie Blackman;

A Shakespeare play, such as ‘The Tempest’ or ‘Twelfth Night’;

Modern poetry.

There are many opportunities for different kinds of speaking and listening and drama in lessons.

The teaching of grammar, technical and functional skills is embedded into all that we do and students are supported in their application of these skills through a range of strategies to promote literacy development across the curriculum.

What parents can do to help:

On the school website, there is a very helpful link to ‘Understanding Progress in English: A Guide for Parents’.

The helpful advice given on the Reading, Writing and Communication across the Curriculum page is also excellent and very relevant to English.

Promote the importance of your child checking their work at home with a green pen for any literacy errors.

Encourage your son or daughter to read for pleasure and, if possible, read together. If you don’t know what to choose, ask Mrs Freeman in the library!

Useful websites:

BBC Bitesize KS3
SAM Learning

Overview for Year 8:

In years 8 we want students to continue to have a rich and enjoyable experience, leading them to engage with and to be highly motivated by their English lessons, as well as to understand and value the functional aspect of the subject.

Students are encouraged to work with increasing independence as well as with different kinds of groups. We offer interesting and appropriate resources and learning activities for all students whatever their ability, including the use of technology to support learning.

In addition to lessons in the classroom, all Key Stage 3 classes have a regular lesson in the library to help promote good, independent reading habits and a real sense of pleasure from reading a range of fiction and non-fiction texts. Students are encouraged to challenge themselves in their reading and record their reading on their Reading Records.

Homework aims to provide students with a variety of tasks to promote independence and further their learning in lessons. The length and complexity of the task will be suited to your child’s needs and ability and will show progression over the course of their time in KS3.

At year 8, students study:

An author study, either looking at a selection of works by Charles Dickens or Arthur Conan Doyle;

A novel, such as ‘The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas,’ or ‘Holes’;

A collection of multi-cultural poetry;

A modern play, such as Philip Pullman’s adaptation of ‘Frankenstein’ or Willy Russell’s ‘Our Day Out’;

Persuasive non-fiction, including writing, debate and a formal presentation;

Creative Writing.

The teaching of grammar, technical and functional skills is embedded into all that we do and students are supported in their application of these skills through a range of strategies to promote literacy development across the curriculum.

What parents can do to help

Follow the link on the school website to ‘Understanding Progress in English: A Guide for Parents’.

Promote the importance of your child checking their work at home with a green pen for any literacy errors.

Encourage your son or daughter to read for pleasure and, if possible, read together. If you don’t know what to choose, ask Mrs Freeman in the library!

Useful websites:

BBC Bitesize KS3
SAM Learning


Overview for Year 9:

In year 9 we want students to continue to have a rich and enjoyable experience, leading them to engage with and to be highly motivated by their English lessons, as well as to understand and value the functional aspect of the subject. We aim to prepare students for the demands of Key Stage 4 and their GCSE studies in Year 10 and 11.

Students are encouraged to work with increasing independence as well as with different kinds of groups. We offer interesting and appropriate resources and learning activities for all students whatever their ability, including the use of technology to support learning.

In addition to lessons in the classroom, all Key Stage 3 classes have a regular lesson in the library to help promote good, independent reading habits and a real sense of pleasure from reading a range of fiction and non-fiction texts. Students are encouraged to challenge themselves in their reading and they all have access to challenging texts and encouraged to record their reading on a Reading record.

Homework aims to provide students with a variety of tasks to promote independence and further their learning in lessons. The length and complexity of the task will be suited to your child’s needs and ability and will show progression over the course of their time in KS3.

At year 9, students study:

An author study with a focus on World Seminal Literature, looking at the works of John Steinbeck including works of nonfiction;

Transactional writing to include: articles, reports, speeches and letters.

A selection of classic and modern poetry;

A Shakespeare play such as: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ or ‘Much Ado about Nothing’;

Reading a range of modern fiction and narrative writing;

An introduction to media.

Start of the Key Stage 4 English Language GCSE in the summer term by doing a spoken language presentation.

The teaching of grammar, technical and functional skills is embedded into all that we do and students are supported in their application of these skills through a range of strategies to promote literacy development across the curriculum.

What parents can do to help:

Follow the link on the school website to ‘Understanding Progress in English: A Guide for Parents’.

Promote the importance of your child checking their work at home with a green pen for any literacy errors.

Encourage your son or daughter to read for pleasure and, if possible, read together. If you don’t know what to choose, ask Mrs Freeman in the library!

Useful websites:

BBC Bitesize KS3
SAM Learning

 

CLICK HERE to view our English Controlled Assessment Information

Key Stage three assessment descriptors are attached below.  The “learning pathway” (e.g.  8-9) indicates the likely GCSE grade that a student may expect at the end of year 11, based upon both their current attainment and year of study. 

 

English-Reading-Year-7.pdf     

English-Spoken-Language-Year-7.pdf

English-Writing-Year-7.pdf

  

English-Reading-Year-8.pdf

English-Spoken-Language-Year-8.pdf

English-Writing-Year-8.pdf

 

English-Reading-Year-9.pdf    

English-Spoken-Language-Year-9.pdf

English-Writing-Year-9.pdf